#FridayArt4Emergency: ‘Solastalgia’ – the film

I have been thinking for some time, in my development of an online course for essential ecoliteracy, that I should begin sharing creative works.

Many people have asked me how to develop creative work for the ecological emergency that is not too preachy. This sometimes seems a hard thing to achieve with a complex topic in which many creative workers and their audiences are little informed of the environmental collapse that modern civilization promotes. In these urgent times, we need all types of creative approaches to envision and inspire a new ecological way of living, that safeguards lives now and for the future.

I also wanted to chime with Greta Thunberg’s extraordinary efforts, and many other young people across the world who are raising awareness that we must all understand the environmental science that confirms our way of living is causing accelerating ecological collapse and mounting social injustice in many countries. With Greta and the children schoolstriking every Friday, I will likewise post an art practice every Friday that I feel touches audiences and inspires creative workers too.

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For my 1st post of #FridayArt4Emergency, I’m starting with a new short film work that incorporates dance, spoken poetry, and audio-visual recordings of the other-than human world. The film work is titled Solastalgia (2019, Pascal Tremblay and Sean Stiller, British Columbia). The film embodies responses to a new term for the grief many of us now feel for our environment ‘solastalgia’, particularly highlighted these last few weeks with the devasting increasing deforestation and fires set off across the Amazon region.

Although the film doesn’t mention it, the film also ably depicts, through dance, image and words, a powerful, underlying ‘soliphilia’, our graditude and love for the Earth.

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These new terms, solastalgia, soliphilia, and more, are from Australian farmer-philosopher Glenn Albrecht. In his recent book Earth Emotions: New Words For a New World (2019) (which I previously have written about here), he details how such terms, and shared in creative works have much power to inspire a new, sustainable way of being with the Earth. He believes that creative workers will be at the forefront to share ideas of a new age, the Symbiocene, where we live life so all beings thrive.

Solastalgia the film below conveys the context of the crisis many creative people are now approaching in a emotive, engaging way. Works like this can move us in ways science can’t – we need both understanding and engaging ways to change societal behaviour to the better world we know is possible.

Congratulations to the communication agency, Good Kind Films – their ethos speaks to a new ecological age, the skilled filmmaker, dancer and world renowned eco-poet and educator Craig Santos Perez from Guam.

Lets share this film, this meme for the Symbiocene, far and wide.

The background story to this film is here

PS I have found other filmworks on Solastalgia made in recent months since writing the above. It’s so fantastic to see more creative expressions, more ecoliteracy fluency and confidence developing in the arts, for these urgent times.

Do feel welcome to share works that inspire you too!

 

The power of our collective voices for a living, just Earth: from Rachel to Greta

Its been heartening to see the voices raised for the planet in the last few months since the international Climate Change Panel (2018), the WWF (2018) have starkly given a timeframe of little over a decade to address the intersecting eco-social emergencies that are accelerating around us.


We can all be empowered to do the same in our communities – asking all politicians and those with power to address these issues as the number 1 priority for a just, equitable, world.


So many people have inspired my work but I’m so aware that it has often been women, feminists and others on the margins, those in the global south, those in male-dominated domains and industries, who have contributed so much to raising global consciousness about safeguarding the only liveable planet we know. I dedicate my Haumea work to all the women, feminists and others who have bravely spoken for a living, just Earth.

I dedicate my work to all the women, feminists and others — mothers, sisters, scientists, writers, academics, artists, musicians, theorists and theatre-makers, comedians, poets, presidents, feminists (many men are feminists you know), farmers, gardeners, lawyers, philosophers, women in tech, women carers and teenage girls who are empowering us all to raise our voices to safeguard the only beautiful, life-giving home we have.

From Rachel Carson’s Silent Spring (1962) to Greta Thunberg’s ‘School Strike for Climate’ (2018 ongoing) inspiring the youth around the world – thank you all!